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is missing, the reason state budgets are strapped is that the economies are sluggish. it is four percent growth we don't have the problem. the issue that is it facing us in the past election is weather we are willing to pay for the government we need. we are cutting 20 billion from the california schools and that result necessary bigger classrooms and fewer teachers. the only small part of the short fall is it 10 billion or six-10 billion made up through the taxings. are we willing to pay for the government that we need? case tl system. >> we have to run. ualian over spending was a big piece of the problem in california. you have three bankrupt. take a break. and lending a hand to victims of super storm sandy. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry unive
years now and unemployment rate under 5%, but a terrible economy and a terrible stock market. so, you want a natural unemployment rate to grow not with artificial constant perpetual government deficit spending and again, i think your our government can lower it over the next four years, that's not necessarily good for the country and the economy and the stck market. >> gary b. the question, does government drop and they grow or the privateector grow and where you get the true growth for the the econy? >> exactly, brenda, yeah, you showed in the graphic as we opened up the segment, that caterpillar, in this environment, you know, with things like sandy going on and things would be for casting job growth and hiring people, but instead they're laying off people and yet a longist of companies on that and the reason is, they see a sour economy. >> why do they see a sour economy? >> government is growing bigger and stephan, about 24%, study after study has shown, as government takes ove a bigger percentage of gdp, it surely will, faster than perceived or forecast at gdp growth, it crowds ou
about the u.s. economy. >> you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> hello. welcome to today's "worldwide exchange". >> 40 unions in 23 countries. that's the strikes that are planned across europe today. so if you thought there couldn't be any coordination, there is coordination. >> how are we going to be affected? >> you know, air travel, surprisingly, they have had to have a lot of cancelling due to strikes. >> we're fully at our jobs. there's two hours of it today. let's remind you exactly what's coming up. we'll have updates from beijing throughout the program as the new generation takes the first step towards leadership. >> and we're in london. talk to the ceo of wpp, martin sorrel. >> we discuss japanese banks. >> and the latest on cisco from silicon valley as the network equipment maker warns of slowing growth this quarter and some falling demand in europe. >> more than 2,000 delegates have cast their votes for china's new central committee, marking the end of the week long communist party. the world will have to wait one more day
president obama to lead us. his first comments on the economy sense reelection, he seems emboldened by his reelection. with more on this, chris stirewalt. it is great to have you here. i want to start by talking abut what the president had to say today. he seemed pretty firm on what he said so far about what we need to do with taxes in this country. here is the president. >> i am open to compromise. i am open to new ideas. i am committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that is not balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. [applause] gerri: chris, jay carney comes out a few minutes later and he says, well, the president says he will raise taxes on wealthy. so where is the compromise? >> the hope is that the compromise lies in a broader reform. but as you know, this comes down to chime in. you have the fiscal cliff. what democrats want to do really -- what they want to do is use this moment with maximal
on the economy could be catastrophic. president obama delivers a big economic speech in about eight hours, and he wants tax cuts for the wealthy to extire. house speaker john boehner drawing this line in the sand. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. and, frankly, it couldn't even pass the house. i'm not sure it can pass the senate. >> white house correspondent brianna keilar is live from washington, d.c. for us this morning. brianna, speaker boehner seemed to be offering the president on olive branch earlier this week when he talked about the possibility of increasing revenue. but here he's taking a hard stance against tax increases. what does that say about the chances of a compromise? >> well, it may actually sound kind of like it's splitting hairs. but it's really two different things where he's talking about increasing tax rates. he says he's not okay with that. but he would be maybe okay, maybe amenable to increasing revenue. to bringing in more tax dollars, because there is a difference. and what he's saying is part of a chorus of conciliatory language that we're hearing from democrats an
an address from the east room of the white house about the economy and reducing the deficit. it is a speech republicans will be watching closely coming up and to the lame-duck session. as reluctant that battle and beyond, we want to hear about your top priorities for the second term. how successful do you think he will be at addressing them? give us a call on the democratic 585-3880.- republicans 202-585-3881. independents 202-585-3882. a very good morning to you. a lot of discussion about the president's second term and what needs to be addressed and the near and long term. we want to hear from you, but we will point out a few headlines. this from "the wall street journal." also from "the washington post." the front page of the commentary section of "the washington times." also, we want to point you to the front page of the business section of "the new york times." a front-page article on the difficult decisions involving the housing market. i want to bring you to the front page of "bloomberg busines sweek." that is a picture of president obama perhaps what he might look like four years fr
that will make a difference in the future economy of this country. we are in a mess. he is in a position like a lot of previous presidents. he's got to be thinking, am i going to leave a disastrous legacy in the hands of our grandchildren? or am i going to step up and lead? i used to get criticized because i was a deal maker. i talked to people like joe lieberman, we would find a way to get things done. you have to give a little to get a little. doesn't wind up getting you in trouble? oh, yes. but after all, that is what this is all about. the president has said himself, and i quoted him in an article that may run in the "washington post" tomorrow, he says america deserves better. it begins with him. mcconnell has to be engaged. harry reid has to be engaged. we are at a profit this year. maybe it is the fiscal cliff. but we have to act on a lot of really serious things and we had some of it now. we have to do a lot of it next year. if they do the right thing, that our country will benefit the legacy will be secure. so i want to open this up. a lot of people in this room are engaged in this ef
to go over the fiscal cliff and see the economy gumbel before the majority of the people -- crumble before the majority of the people realize how much trouble we are in. i have end-stage renal failure and on medicare and receive disability each month. i do dialysis three times a week. that said, i will willingly and gladly take reduction in my benefits if it means we can reduce our deficit. i have two young nieces, and i'm looking out for their financial future. in fact, if i knew that taking away all of my benefits would get rid of our debt, i'd do that today. mr. president, hear tony's plea. don't take us over the fiscal cliff. tony and his nieces need you to lead. they need it now. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois, mr. gutierrez, for five minutes. mr. gutierrez: mr. speaker, i'm here today to make an introduction. i'd like the republican party to meet america's latinos. it's hard to meet us all at once. there are more than 53 million of us. but let me tell you a little bit about who we are and what
debate and what the economy needs to stay in recovery mode. a setting rich in theater coming just hours after the speaker of the house, boehner, made his case. >> indeed he did, ty. thank you. i'm sue herera, along with my partner tyler mathisen. john harwood and eamon javers are in washington as we countdown to the president's statement in a few minutes. we're hearing that the white house has invited congressional leaders for a meeting at the white house next week on the fiscal cliff. that seems to mean, john, to me anyway, a little bit of progress. what type of tone do you expect, john, the president to take in this next address? >> sue, i expect him to be conciliatory and reaching out to republicans the way john boehner has tried to strike that mode on capitol hill. two different white house specialists just told me the president will walk out here and announce he's invited the bipartisan leadership of congress to the white house next week to begin talks on the fiscal cliff. i have to think there is a possibility that they can really make some headway, if not solve the problem before
of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspire her customers for only $15 a month. [ dog barking ] her dream -- to be the area's hottest interior design office. [ children laughing ] right now, she just dreams of an office. get a free trial at constantcontact.com. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really g
into a difficult first quarter in terms of the economy next year. so this is almost a situation where you can't hope for or root for any outcome. you have to let it play out and assess what its impact on the economy can be. but the risks right now are to the downside. the sad thing is that as we speak, the economy is actually doing pretty well. >> susie: that's good to hear. as you know, a number of very high-profile c.e.o.s are meeting with the president at the white house today, the c.e.o.s from companies like ibm and xerox and general electric. how much sway do you think these c.e.o.s have over the president? >> if he is smart, he'll listen to them. but that is not the constituenconstituency will eled him. the coalition that elected him supports his hard line on taxes as a percentage of the total package, and he has an obligation -- incidentally, i think an ideological belief that he has to go that way, and that's -- i think that raises the odds of a difficult -- a very difficult period here politically. and while he loyc listens to them and went through the theatrics of having met with th
that's ever been reelected, and if his job really is to lower unemployment and raise the economy, if that's really what he wants, i don't think it is. i think he's a doctrine, big government, socialistic guy. but if he wants to help the economy, it's to cut government spending. balancing the budget doesn't matter if the budget is real high. >> he's taken -- he proposes to take money out of the private sector. $1.6 trillion, which kind of came out yesterday or the day before, blew everybody's mind. but how do you see this? stock market falling after the reelection. i know there are many factors in the stock market. but my question is this, t.j. from your vantage point out there and from your vantage point philosophically, what do you think the president wants to do? what do you think people reelected him to do? >> well, i'm not sure they reelected him to do anything. there's been a lot of blather about the obama mandate. the fact is it was an obama squeaker and if the republicans had put up a better candidate as ronald reagan got put up against jimmy carter, president obama would
economy, stronger, healthier economy means more americans working and more revenues, which is what the president is seeking. this framework can lead to common ground. i hope the president will respond today in that same spirit. as i said on wednesday, this is an opportunity for the president to lead. >> that was speaker of the house, john boehner, talking about the looming fiscal cliche. republicans are ready to sit down at the table with president obam a. but is he prepared to compromise? listen to when he had to say earlier today. >> i want to be clear. i am not wedded to every dedale tail of my plan. i am open to compromise. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. i am not going to do that. i want to point out, this was a central question during the election. it was debated over and over again. and on tuesday night, we found out that the majority of americans agree with my approach. and that includes democrat independents and a lot of r
are talking about slows growth in the economy. it is the prudent thing to do to get the fiscal house in order but all those things will keep growth somewhat tepid and 22013. liz: two things helping the economy improve, retail sales number did not look that good, but depending on the company certainly. it is not all bad news. give me an example of people running for safety. >> pfizer is the perfect example. what is so interesting about that? liz: people feel safety, visor, the industry. >> it feels good to own those well-recognized names. you should look for the companies that are growing despite that. it is amazing people feel okay losing money in pfizer because it is pfizer. if you lost money in a company you are less familiar with. liz: some of those very names he feels are the places to be. the long-term bullish stock picker to, the number one moneymaker. 50 minutes before the closing bell rings. remember the '80s when the japanese bought everything american including the rockefeller center? chinese companies are now doing the same thing. plowing money into u.s. assets, u.s. companies at a
the only democratic candidate running on a record of a weak economy and debt crisis that we face and still win. yet, he did. they did very many things that were right. you can point to a couple of things with mitt romney. he may not have been the perfect candidate for 2012 given his corporate turnaround background, secondly, he did not get something republicans have counted on and that is the white working-class voters. in states like ohio, the ads attacking mayor romney as a corporate raider and buccaneer that went on for many months put on by the obama campaign seemed to work. the white working-class vote did not turn out for mitt romney in the numbers he needed. host: you had a piece yesterday, "the survivor in chief." you know to that they expose the myth of the enthusiastic democratic voter. guest: it was a myth i subscribe to for a while. i am sure you read about this over and over again. the democratic voters were dispirited and they were not feeling enthusiastic about the campaign. it was the conservatives and republicans fired up and getting ready to go. the notion was, he would h
that is divided, there was an earthquake. it was an election that, republicans should have won in a bad economy, with all that money, and they lost virtually every group. they even lost cubans in florida, which used to reliable vote. so you have to ask what does the republican party do next? but that is not my top priority frankly. >> don't broad brush it excessively. the republicans kept the house, the democrats kept the senate and the president, a democrat, kept the white house. that is a split verdict. >> beneath those numbers there was an earthquake john. >> oh, the hidden earthquake. nobody felt it? >> everybody feels it. >> nothing on the restrictter scale but there was -- on the scale. >>> when you think we had 23 million people unemployed and the worst in our history and he still carried it through. i would call it a landslide under the conditions he had to run. i think it was a decisive victory. >> it was on several counts. first the exit polling showed most of the voters did blame the economic problems on bush and they wanted to give obama more time to work on it. pretty significant c
the consumer. will that halt a chance for a full recovery for our economy. i am david asbin. welcome to forbes on fox. we'll go to teave, and rick and victoria and morgan and elizabeth. stove is not repealing health care law hurt the recovery? >> it will hurt subis it notly. it will hit the bad pars and no coincidence after the election . taxes are going for individuals and businesses. do they dump the people on medicare and you will see another thing happen, fewer full-time yobs and not catching up in obamacare. >> rick unger, it is not just businesss and folks of businesses making over $150,000.ine those making $50,000 or more it will cost them money . it is going to cost and maybe it is good in the long run but it costs. >> the arguments remind me what we heard in the 60s when fica taxes were doubled to pay for medicare . we survived. you would not imagine calls i have had business owners and cancer survivors it is going to survive and now the law of the land. we'll talk about it in three years and not going to cost a yob. jobs are going to grow. >> is this a rick unger. are you willing to
there is in the economy. i'm a little confused as to why you would think that would happen. >> what i'm saying is you could pick any target you want. picking targets is a far cry from actually making a difference on things like unemployment. targets are easy. >> but here's the thing. >> but the target is 2015. rates aren't movmoving. what are you suggesting? the fed was clear about this. >> if the rates go up, we're in a big, big problem because we cannot service the debt. they have to keep them down. >> very good point. >> i don't think that's what's behind fed policy. >> i do. >> when you think about higher interest rates, you have to consider why interest rates would be higher. they could be higher if there was more economic growth. more economic growth would mean higher tax revenue. in that regard, you wouldn't necessarily have to have these low interest rates. you could service a higher interest rate and a higher debt service if there was more economic growth. >> how do we get economic growth? >> when the private sector decides it's going to invest and spend and hire, maria. those are the source
, according to economists, will have the least positive impact on our economy. >> the president also coming to the defense of susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, who just a few days after the attack as you recall said violence on the u.s. consulate in benghazi began as a spontaneous protest against an anti-islam film. two top-ranking republicans are vowing to block rice's nomination if she is picked to be the next secretary of state. the president firing back with a rare flash of anger. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. >> white house correspondent dan lothian, live from washington this morning. it's really nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> let's first talk about the fiscal cliff. the president said we could see a deal by next week. that may hinge on this issue with taxes. how are republicans responding to the president's remarks? >> well, you know, first of all, there does seem a willingness by republicans to find areas of agreement, to reach a compromise. but they are pushing back on the presid
revenue, ad goo portion of which goes to pay down the debt, and he wants to grow the economy putting america back to work. you know, in california, the governor had 12.5% unemployment. taking office, down to 10.2%, a few more stop looking, so it's 11%, one out of eight california nans not works. you don't have people believing in the american dream if they don't have something to do. i think what the president wants to do is create growth, generate revenues for the people -- neil: i know what he wants to do. sorry, i was not clear. i know what he wants to do, but wondering whether what he proposed today was something that could be flexible? in other words, yes, he wants to raises taxes on the rich. that's going to happen, but maybe the olive branch he's offering back to the branch that boehner offered him is that it needn't be an immediate return to the top rate, but a combination of closing credits, allowances, breaks, that sort of thing. i could be wrong, but that he is maybe leaving that vague, the goals should be the riich pay more, but what he's working on are the details, how m
that is good for your business but bad for the economy in general to tax some people. romney had a good line you don't just pick winners and losers but you pick the losers. john: they could the random selection people look at politician as the person to solve every problem? president obama was the magic president. these people were waiting three hours. he is magic. >> they've really feel he has the intrinsic quality now they he has been reelected to change people's lives like he has only been warming up. for what? it is terrifying. john: people felt this way about romney. >> but obama is a classic example of the colt of the presidency the idea that any politician can fix all the problems is not start with the obama but is the attitude we should get rid of racism. he should stop the rise of the oceans and get everybody house. i saw a teenager said he should give everybody a house. kids say that is understandable. but adults are supposed to understand there are incentives, a trade offs and a cost. there are unintended consequences government cannot magically eradicate homelessness and poverty.
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: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even struck as far away as tel aviv. three israelis were killed. we begin with this report by john ray of "independent television news." ( gunfire ) >> reporter: in gaza, gunfire and a thirst for revenge. thousands throng the streets for the funeral of a hamas leader killed by israel. the first death of this conflict but how many more will follow? the mood here is of great anger and defiance. militarily, ha
. they are the ones who hire. that is a huge issue because jobs drive the economy. that is what the cbo is looking at if the fiscal cliff goes through we will see a contraction of the economy. >> gregg: over the next four years, what industries or companies could be winners or losers? >> i mentioned some of the ones that were hard hit and some of the others that did well after the election. if you look at things companies that pay out dividends. >> gregg: utilities. >> very good point. we'll see that the sector hit. it's been down 5% just for fears of this. you could see tech companies go up. they don't pay dividends. they plow their cash back in the company. their lobbyists have been success withful with the congress. >> gregg: financial industry despises the dodd-frank hyper regulations. they were trying too to overturn it. it doesn't look terribly likely right now unless the courts do it in some information. is that still negotiable because the rule making is still in the hands of regulators? >> yeah, it is but a lot of pessimism by banks about this whole issue. they will be facing these regula
dollars back in the u.s. economy this year. in pipes, cement, steel, jobs, energy. we need to get the wheels turning. i'm p. making real things... for real. ...that make a real difference. ♪ but when i was in an accident... ...that make a real difference. i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. so i never missed a beat. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> hurricane sandy left a trail of destruction in its wake. it also left us with this statistic. three of the ten biggest floods in lower manhattan since 1900 have occurred in the last three years. and it's not just new york. freak weather seems to be here to stay all over the globe. on the one hand, the world needs to think about how to stop or reverse climate change, but in the meantime, we will have to figure out how to adapt to what is becoming a new normal. i'm joined by two distinguished experts. bryan walsh is a senior writer for "time" magazine. he reported this week a terrific story on how to climateproof a city. and jeff sachs, a re
business." $6 billion invested in this economy. did we see a boost in the sluggish economy? guest: christmas in september for the television stations in some of battleground states. stations were cutting back on programming so they could fit in all the advertising. we have tried to get a handle on the tv ads and have created a database which pulls in the advertising that is not registered at the federal communications commission. it is the top 50 markets. we are trying to pull that together and have asked volunteers to go to some of the uncovered markets and help us collect the other advertising. there are these concentrated pockets of spending in these communities. the television stations are telling us it is difficult to make these filings and put this in an electronic format. hire an extra clerk or two if you're making so much extra money. host: is this estimate correct -- about a million commercials? guest: as far as i know, yes. it certainly shows like at least a million. host: matt on the republican line. you are on with kathy kiely. caller: i have good news for the democrat
, the implications for the economy are going to be truly first order. with growing over the cliff, holding their risk of recession in tutus it -- 2013, and that is not good for anybody's political future. lou: not good for anyone's political future, but i am getting increasingly less interested in political futures on the part of these folks and a lot more interested in the futures of 23 million people who still don't have jobs or underemployed. 8 million people who are working part-time and one full-time jobs . the list goes on. 5 million people who have been out of work for six months or longer. i guess what i'm saying here is, what about there future and why in the world can't we come to a resolution here before we go to a january 1st and watch all of these triggers go into effect? >> the key economic question, the central economic question of the next year to is what will it take to get the corporate sector to startthiring and investing again. to put those millions of unemployed folks back to work and to start expanding the scale of production, and i think bottom line is that the corporates are w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)